Peter Robert Casey, known less regally as “PRC,” is a father, husband and degenerate basketball junkie. Before co-founding Sports Passport, he steered and stewarded online communities for the New York Knicks and Nike Basketball, and once covered St. John’s men’s basketball team exclusively via his personal Twitter account. Which was a thing. He’s been to all 29 NBA arenas, over 50 Division I home basketball gyms and has ambitions to attend a college hoops game in every state.
1) What is sports passport?

Sports Passport is a website and soon-to-be mobile app that lets fans track and chronicle every game they attend. We’re your virtual shoebox of ticket stubs.

2) How did you come up with the idea for the sports passport?

I wanted a better way to keep track of my basketball bucket list. The Google Doc I used was too static and sterile. While trying to validate my idea with a slew of sports fans, I learned that there was equal or greater interest in tracking games attended in the past. So I combined the two.
What began as Basketball Passport has blossomed into Sports Passport presented by New York Life, which now spans five sports and ten leagues.


3) What is the future of sports passport in business?

We’re getting ready to release the 3.0 version of our web and mobile web experience in the next two weeks, and will launch our iOS app later this fall.


4) What makes your company different to your competitors?

Fans’ sports game-going memories are either stuffed away in shoebox or fragmented across multiple social media channels, or both. Sports Passport lets you bind them all back to the game, and preserve those memories forever.
We also serve up your personalized stats. If you’re a Nationals fan, we’ll let you know what the team’s record is based only on games you’ve attended, and how many Bryce Harper home runs you’ve witnessed.


5) What advice would you give to aspiring entrepreneurs?

There’s an old adage to remember: The temptation to quit will be greatest right before you’re about to achieve success. It’s true. There are times to quit, sure. But way too many people pack it in early, usually at the first encounter with adversity. Plow through it.

We would like to thank Peter for speaking with us.